Amelanchier asiatica (Sieb. & Zucc.) Walp.

Modern name

Amelanchier asiatica (Siebold & Zucc.) Endl. ex Walp.

Synonyms

Aronia asiatica Sieb. & Zucc.; A. canadensis var. japonica Miq.; Aronia asiatica Sieb. & Zucc; A. canadensis var. japonica Miq.

A deciduous tree, of very graceful habit, 15 to 40 ft high, branches slender. Leaves oval or ovate, pointed, 112 to 3 in. long, half as much wide, sometimes nearly or wholly entire, but mostly toothed except at the base; covered when quite young with a loose floss which soon falls away, leaving both surfaces quite glabrous. Flowers on stalks 12 to 34 in. long, in broad, erect racemes 112 to 212 in. long; white, fragrant; petals strap-shaped, 58 in. long. Fruit black-purple, about the size of a black currant.

Native of China, Korea, and Japan, introduced from the last-named country in 1865. The Chinese form, which is sometimes given varietal rank as var. sinic a Schneid., differs little from the type; it was introduced in 1920. It is not easy to distinguish A. asiatica from some of the forms of A. arborea, but at Kew it always flowers two or three weeks later (usually in mid-May, when the leaves are about full size), and the petals are uniformly strap-shaped. Also, the top of the ovary is woolly, while in A. arborea it is glabrous. A slender, elegant tree.



From the Supplement (Vol. V)

A deciduous tree, of very graceful habit, 15 to 40 ft high, branches slender. Leaves oval or ovate, pointed, rounded or sometimes cordate at the base, 1[1/2] to 3 in. long, half as much wide, sometimes nearly or wholly entire, but mostly finely toothed except at the base, covered when quite young with a loose floss which soon falls away, leaving both surfaces quite glabrous. Flowers white, slightly fragrant, in rather broad racemes 1[1/2] to 2[1/2] in. long; pedicels [1/2] to [3/4] in. long. Petals strap-shaped, about [5/8] in. long. Top of ovary woolly. Fruits black-purple, about the size of a black currant.

Native of Japan, Korea and China; introduced from Japan in 1865. The Chinese race, which is sometimes given varietal rank as var. sinica Schneid., differs little from the type; it was introduced in 1920. It is not always easy to distinguish this amelanchier from A. arborea, but at Kew it always flowers two or three weeks later (usually in mid-May), when the leaves are fully expanded. Also the top of the ovary is woolly, while in A. arborea it is glabrous. A slender, elegant tree, colouring red or orange in the autumn.

Genus

Amelanchier

Other species in the genus